College Resources Header

During SheTech 2021, the attendees were able to ask college representatives questions.  Due to time constraints, not all the questions were able to be answered at the event, so representatives from the colleges provided answers below!  Check out answers to questions ranging from “What is your scholarship program like?“, “How do you discover what you want to do?” to “Should I live on campus in a dorm, or get an apartment.”

College Representatives 

The College of Idaho
Tracey Spencer, Senior Admissions Counselor
tspencer@collegeofidaho.edu

Boise State University
Sondra M. Miller, Associate Professor, Associate Dean for Undergraduate Studies in the Department of Civil Engineering
sondramiller1@boisestate.edu

Idaho State University
Dana Gaudet, Asst Director of Enrollment & Student Services
danagaudet@isu.edu

College of Western Idaho
Andrea Schumaker, Department Chair – Department of Physical and Agricultural Sciences
andreaschumaker@cwi.edu
Aaron VonLindern, Department Chair – Department of Health Sciences
aaronvonlindern@cwi.edu

University of Idaho
Jessica Eby, Assistant Director of Admissions
jeby@uidaho.edu

What is your scholarship program like?

College of Idaho: Average institutional scholarship awards are $21,218 per student, per year. Students are automatically considered for academic merit scholarships ranging from $10,000-$20,000 per year based on their GPA. We also offer diversity scholarships, talent scholarships, additional need-based aid, and more. To learn about specific scholarships, check out our scholarship website or email me directly! 

College of Western Idaho: We have a single application for students to submit which can be found here: https://cwi.edu/current-students/grants-scholarships This application matches students to the scholarships they qualify for based on their major, gpa, grade level, or other criteria for specific scholarships. 

Boise State University: We offer a variety of scholarships. Students will be considered for automatic scholarships as long as they have their application and materials in by the scholarship deadline. Additional scholarship opportunities may be available through a separate application process. Scholarship criteria and deadlines can be seen here: https://www.boisestate.edu/scholarships/ (Automatic scholarship, can be seen in step 2. Additional funding opportunities can be seen in steps 3-5)

Idaho State University: ISU awards automatic tuition scholarships based on cumulative, unweighted HS GPA to students who apply by our priority deadline (May 1 for Fall start). We also have the Bengal Online Scholarship System (BOSS) where students can search and apply for recommended scholarships opportunities that match their qualifications. You must be admitted to ISU in order to access BOSS.

University of Idaho: Our main scholarship program is our Go Idaho! Program, which is based on a high school student’s unweighted cumulative high school GPA. Students who have at least a 3.0 are awarded $1,000 up to $4,000 per year for four years. We also offer scholarships through our Honors program, various departments, and we offer a full-ride to National Merit Finalists. You can find more information here: https://www.uidaho.edu/financial-aid/scholarships/undergraduate/hs-resident

Do you recommend dorming or getting an apartment?

College of Idaho: The College of Idaho has a three-year on-campus living requirement. Freshmen can choose from many different themed communities, including a STEAM floor, a Healthy Living floor, an Outdoor floor, and more! After the first year, we also have many different residence options, including on-campus apartments and houses. We believe that no matter what college you choose, one of the best ways to ensure your success your first year is to live on campus! The College of Idaho is a very tight-knit community and there is always something going on — when you are on campus, all these opportunities are right in your back yard! 

College of Western Idaho: We don’t offer housing on campus therefore most students opt for an apartment or living with a family member.

Boise State University:  Living on campus gives you the full Boise State experience, and helps you get connected with students, faculty and staff. You’re in the heart of campus life, close to classes, food, the library and the recreation center. You are steps away from a host of resources to help you succeed. We highly recommend looking into on campus housing options as a freshmen.

Idaho State University: Living on campus is not required at ISU, but it is highly recommended. On average, we have found that our students who live on-campus have higher GPAs, likely due to close access to student services like our Student Success Center, library, your classes/professors, etc. You’re also more likely to meet people, get involved, and have fun!

University of Idaho: I always recommend that students live on campus! We require that all first-year students live on campus (residence halls or fraternities/sororities), but students can petition to live off-campus their first year if they so choose. Studies show that students who live on campus do better academically and socially. Plus, living on campus where all the fun is! I lived on campus all four years and I absolutely loved it and recommend it whole-heartedly.

Does the college accept dual credits? If I take them do I not have to take them at the college level?  Does your college offer online resources, say for students doing dual credit/associates program (AA) classes?

College of Idaho: We do accept dual credit and AP classes. If your dual credit class is equivalent to a class required for one of your majors or minors at The College of Idaho, then it can take the place of that class. If it is not equivalent, you will still receive college credit but it will count as an elective. We do not offer any online dual credit classes, but we will happily honor credits offered by any other Idaho college — even many out-of-state colleges!

College of Western Idaho: Yes- CWI accepts and offers many Dual Credit Courses. I always encourage students to take advantage of these while you’re in high school- it’s a great way to jump start your college transcript. If you satisfy a course as Dual Credit (for example ENGL 101 then when you arrive to college that course will be satisfied once you request your official college transcript to have it transferred over) You can learn more at our website: https://cwi.edu/programs-degrees/dual-credit 

Boise State University: Yes, many students come in with dual credits and/or AP courses from high school. Send your official transcripts through the admissions process. We offer dual credits at the high school level: www.boisestate.edu/concurrentenrollment/.

Idaho State University: Certainly! Prior to attending ISU, please request all official college transcripts from which you’ve earned dual credit. This will help with academic advising/class registration during “New Student Orientation” when you sign up for your freshmen classes. Generally, all dual credit courses earned from Idaho institutions will transfer smoothly to ISU. For more information, reach out to Dana Gaudet at danagaudet@isu.edu — Dana does dual credit ISU for future ISU students. You can also check out https://coursetransfer.idaho.gov/ for more information.

University of Idaho: We accept dual credits! You can find out more information on what we offer here: https://dualcredit.uidaho.edu/

How could I prepare myself for college early, could I do advanced work?

College of Idaho: I strongly encourage you to take AP or dual credit classes! Not only will these go toward your graduation requirements, but they help better prepare you for the rigor of college classes. Participating in opportunities such as SheTech or other educational summer programs are also a great way to start brainstorming potential careers and majors. Also, VISIT CAMPUS! I strongly encourage all students visit the schools that they are interested in, as each college will have a somewhat different ‘vibe’ on campus. Many schools will even let you meet with professors and sit in on classes, so you can get an idea of what it is like to be a student there. These experiences will help you better determine if that college has opportunities to help you reach your goals, and also if you can see yourself calling that campus home for the next two-, four-, or more years! You can schedule a visit to The College of Idaho here.

College of Western Idaho: Dual Credit is a great start! Earning those college credits is a great benefit to you- especially if you’re already enrolled in the class at your high school. Work hard on maintaining good grades and staying active in the various clubs or extracurricular activities you might be a part of. Finally- I always say that searching for some great volunteer opportunities in your field of choice is a great way to safely explore careers while still trying to decide what you want to do in the long run.

Boise State University: Earn college credit through the concurrent enrollment (www.boisestate.edu/concurrentenrollment/ ) or AP courses. Math and science courses will help you prepare for a STEM major. Participating in extracurricular activities, STEM programs, and pursuing leadership roles are always a great way to enhance your skills.

Idaho State UniversityDual credit is a great way to prepare for college. Not only does dual credit give you a jump start by saving time and money, you’ll also be more familiar with college rigor, the enrollment process, and other college terminology. We also recommend involvement with extracurricular activities and leadership opportunities.

University of Idaho: Dual credit is a great way to get college credits while you are in high school, as long as you keep your grades up! Getting a low grade in a dual credit course not only hurts your high school GPA, but also hurts your college GPA. AP tests and ACT/SAT test scores can also help you get credit for classes as well. My advice in preparing for college is to get good grades, get involved in things you enjoy, and explore your college options — don’t limit yourself and keep an open mind.

What is the average cost of college? And how would we prepare for that?

College of Idaho: At The College of Idaho, the Cost of Attendance (tuition, room and board, fees) is about $43,000 per year. The average financial aid package (institutional scholarships as well as grants and $5500 in loans offered through FAFSA) is about $31,000 per year. That means on average, the remaining about a student would be responsible for covering through private scholarships, loans, and/or family contribution is about $12,000 per year. There are a few things you can do to prepare for this. Keep your grades up as this directly translates into more scholarship money! Talk to your family about if they will be able to help with any college costs or with saving for college. Fill out the FAFSA and apply to private scholarships — most scholarships have deadlines around February/March of your senior year, so start early! I know this is a lot of information, so if you have more questions please don’t hesitate to reach out — I am here to help!

College of Western Idaho: You can find a breakdown of our costs online at: https://cwi.edu/current-students/tuition-and-fees Generally I tell students you can expect to pay about $2500 a semester for your tuition and various fees. However remember we charge by the credit so you can be as intense or flexible as you need.

Boise State University: Tuition and Fees for Idaho Residents is $8,060 per year. Other expenses include Room and Board, books, transportation, and personal expenses. www.boisestate.edu/admissions/scholarships/. Fill out the Financial Aid (FAFSA.gov) and apply for scholarships to help pay for college. The city of Boise is a hub for student job opportunities! Many students obtain paid internships and undergraduate research, work on campus, or find off campus positions.

Idaho State UniversityFor most in-state, public institutions, you can expect approximately $8,000/year for tuition. You will also want to plan for housing, books, and other personal expenses. For more information on ISU’s Cost of Attendance, please visit… https://isu.edu/cost/

University of Idaho: Start having conversations with your parents about how you will pay for school. Reach out to Admissions Counselors at schools you are interested in, and attend Financial Aid nights put on at your school (talk to your college/career counselor about it!). Here is our Cost of Attendance: https://www.uidaho.edu/financial-aid/cost-of-attendance

How do you discover what you want to do?

College of Idaho: As a high school student, check out the career discovery resources on Next Steps Idaho. Once you get to college, the career center can also help you figure out what career opportunities there are in your intended field of study. Getting involved, whether through clubs, internships, or going to networking events like SheTech or Alumni-sponsored events at your college, will also help introduce you to opportunities you might not even know existed. Finally, don’t panic if you end up changing your mind! Many students switch their major in college — sometimes even multiple times — and still graduate with a degree they love!

College of Western Idaho: As I mentioned above- get yourself involved in the field you are interested in. Attending an event such as SheTech is a great way to hear from industry experts, network, and gain valuable experience. This translates into more opportunities and things down the road that you might find get you more excited about what to study and the path to get there.

Boise State University: Participate in high school job shadow programs, attend seminars, and read about different careers. Most students take similar classes the first semester, so you have time to explore career options. Get involved in clubs, internships, networking events, seminars, etc. Take a tour of the departments you are interested in, and ask lots of questions.

Idaho State UniversityI would highly recommend leaning on your college/career counselor at your high school. They have excellent resources and online career exploration tools to share with you. I really like the “Future Finder” found on the Next Steps Idaho website… https://nextsteps.idaho.gov/future-finder We also highly recommend job shadowing when possible.

University of Idaho: Take advantage of job shadowing and volunteering opportunities; ask your parents/teachers/counselors/parents of friends how they figured out what they wanted to do. Come to college with an open mind. You don’t have to enter college knowing exactly what you want to do. College is the perfect time to explore and try out new things and discover what you want to do.

How old do you have to be to go to college? Can you go early?

College of Idaho: Students must have graduated or earned a GED by the time they enroll in classes at The College of Idaho.

College of Western Idaho: CWI requires that students have graduated from high school or earned their GED to be degree seeing. We do however have waivers and a process for someone under the age of 18. A lot of students will also attend CWI as a Dual Credit Student. Find out more here: https://cwi.edu/future-students/admissions 

Boise State University: Boise State requires a student to have completed a high school, homeschool, GED, or HiSET. Additional information on this application process can be found here: https://www.boisestate.edu/admissions/apply/ If you are at least 16 years of age and have not completed any of these you can take courses through our concurrent enrollment program:  www.boisestate.edu/concurrentenrollment/. If you are under the age of 16 and have not completed any of said programs you will work directly with the admissions office regarding the process to begin classes.

Idaho State University: ISU does not have an age requirement. We just ask that students have a high school diploma or equivalent and meet our other admission criteria found here… https://www.isu.edu/admissions/freshman/

University of Idaho: We require a high school diploma or GED. You can find more information here: https://www.uidaho.edu/admissions/apply/first-year/admission-requirements 

Any tips on networking and building your skillset during high school/college?

College of Idaho: Say yes to getting involved in new things, going to events, and searching for internships and job shadow opportunities! In high school, your college and career center will be able to help with this. In college, you can go to the academic advising center, the career center, and even talk to your professors!

College of Western Idaho: As I mentioned above it all starts with getting involved while in high school. Once students come to CWI we can:
1. Offer them Jobs on campus that help align with their long term goals.
2. Expose you to various internship opportunities while you are still a freshman or sophomore in college
3. Get you involved with INBRE, B2B, or other Math and Science organizations we have on campus to give you a taste for research and presenting at conferences
4. Get you involved with various student groups and clubs that also have students with similar interests and led by our faculty who are experts in the field.

Boise State University: Internships and on campus jobs as well as career services are great resources you can use to gain experience and build your skillset. These are a few examples: https://boisestate.joinhandshake.com/login and https://www.boisestate.edu/career/internships/

Idaho State University: If you have access to CTE courses at your school or within your district, this is a great way to build your skills and test the waters in some fields. Job shadowing and/or internships are also highly encouraged. As mentioned in the presentation, ISU has the Career Path Internship (CPI) program. As a CPI, ISU will place you in an internship on-campus that is related (or closely related) to your field of interest. This provides you with an opportunity to gain hands-on practice while also earning money to pay for college (min $9/hr, max 20 hrs/wk). More info about the CPI program can be found here… https://www.isu.edu/career/cpi-program/cpi-students/

University of Idaho: In high school get involved in clubs, sports, other after school activities or get a job. In college, get involved in on campus activities and take advantage of internships or research activities as they come up. 

If you wanted to go to an animal research field are there options on how to get hands-on experiences?

College of Idaho: The College of Idaho has majors in Biology-PreVet and Conservational Biology. We also have plenty of opportunities for internships, research, and even study abroad in these fields!

College of Western Idaho: I oversee our Animal Science program at CWI. It’s been great to lead my students through the various avenues that a career in Animal Science can lead to. I have had graduates go on to work for SImplot in the Animal Embryo Lab or take a career at a Veterinarian clinic working closely with our favorite 4-legged friends. We require students to complete a capstone course prior to graduation where they gain a great hands-on experience with one of our many industry partners. Learn more at: https://cwi.edu/program/animal-veterinary-sciences 

Boise State University: Students who wish to pursue a career in veterinary medicine have a great opportunity to receive regular advising from a pre-professional advisor in our pre-veterinary pathways. We also offer Bachelor of Science degrees in Biology as well as in Health Studies. https://www.boisestate.edu/preprofessional/pathways/veterinary/

Idaho State University: ISU has an excellent Pre-Veterinary program, as well as a Bachelor of Science (BS) in Biology with a concentration in Integrative Organismal Biology.

University of Idaho: Absolutely! All of our programs offer opportunities for research experience. The top two colleges that most fit with animal research are our College of Agricultural and Life Sciences and our College of Natural Resources. You can find more info about some of the current research opportunities here: https://www.uidaho.edu/cals/research-and-extension and https://www.uidaho.edu/cnr/research 

Do you have a specific robotics program or do you include that in a type of engineering?

College of Idaho: We do not have a robotics program, but we do have a 3:2 Engineering Program. This is different from a traditional four-year engineering program, so if you are interested in potentially studying engineering at The College of Idaho, reach out to me directly at tspencer@collegeofidaho.edu. I’d love to tell you more about this program and help you determine if it could be a good fit for you!

College of Western Idaho: We offer both an engineering program (designed to transfer into your bachelors degree: https://cwi.edu/program/engineering Along with a very hands on Career and Technical Program Advanced Mechatronics (more up your robotics avenue) https://cwi.edu/program/advanced-mechatronics-engineering-technology 

Boise State University: The College of Engineering at Boise State has several robotics courses related to mechanical engineering, electrical engineering, and computer science. There are undergraduate research opportunities www.boisestate.edu/coen-mbe/directory/aykut-satici/ , Vertically Integrated Projects www.boisestate.edu/vip/, club projects, and senior design projects involving robotics.

Idaho State University: ISU has an excellent Robotics program (“Robotics and Communication Systems Engineering Technology”) within our College of Technology in Pocatello. Our Robotics students have built life-size R2D2 robots! More information about this program can be found here… https://www.isu.edu/robotics/

University of Idaho: We don’t have a specific robotics major, however there are MANY opportunities to get involved in robotics. Here are examples: Aa senior project involving a robotics arms at the Discovery Center in Boise: https://www.uidaho.edu/engr/programs/capstone/robotic-arm; Robotics club: https://www.uidaho.edu/engr/services/student-services/clubs-and-organizations/robotics; Robotics opportunities at our Coeur d’Alene campus: https://www.uidaho.edu/engr/services/student-services/clubs-and-organizations/robotics 

Do you have a specific robotics program or do you include that in a type of engineering?

College of Idaho: We do not have a robotics program, but we do have a 3:2 Engineering Program. This is different from a traditional four-year engineering program, so if you are interested in potentially studying engineering at The College of Idaho, reach out to me directly at tspencer@collegeofidaho.edu. I’d love to tell you more about this program and help you determine if it could be a good fit for you!

College of Western Idaho: We offer both an engineering program (designed to transfer into your bachelors degree: https://cwi.edu/program/engineering Along with a very hands on Career and Technical Program Advanced Mechatronics (more up your robotics avenue) https://cwi.edu/program/advanced-mechatronics-engineering-technology 

Boise State University: The College of Engineering at Boise State has several robotics courses related to mechanical engineering, electrical engineering, and computer science. There are undergraduate research opportunities www.boisestate.edu/coen-mbe/directory/aykut-satici/ , Vertically Integrated Projects www.boisestate.edu/vip/, club projects, and senior design projects involving robotics.

Idaho State University: ISU has an excellent Robotics program (“Robotics and Communication Systems Engineering Technology”) within our College of Technology in Pocatello. Our Robotics students have built life-size R2D2 robots! More information about this program can be found here… https://www.isu.edu/robotics/

University of Idaho: We don’t have a specific robotics major, however there are MANY opportunities to get involved in robotics. Here are examples: Aa senior project involving a robotics arms at the Discovery Center in Boise: https://www.uidaho.edu/engr/programs/capstone/robotic-arm; Robotics club: https://www.uidaho.edu/engr/services/student-services/clubs-and-organizations/robotics; Robotics opportunities at our Coeur d’Alene campus: https://www.uidaho.edu/engr/services/student-services/clubs-and-organizations/robotics 

Do you offer extra activities like orchestra and/or marching band? If so, would it be possible to do both or would they interfere with each other?

College of Idaho: We have marching band, orchestra, jazz band, and various other ensembles! Even if you don’t major or minor in music, you can still participate and also receive a scholarship from the program! You can learn more here: www.collegeofidaho.edu/academics/departments/music 

Boise State University: We have a variety of opportunities for student involvement, including orchestra and marching band. Every program has its schedules and we encourage students to speak with both to see what would work best for the students’ schedule.
Orchestra: https://www.boisestate.edu/music-strings/orchestra/
Blue Thunder Marching Band: https://www.boisestate.edu/thunder/contact-us/

Idaho State University: ISU offers both programs for which you would need to audition with our Music Department. Please call 208-282-3636 for more information.

University of Idaho: Yes — we have both! And fun fact – we have a lot of engineering students in our marching band and music ensembles. You can definitely do both. Student ensembles: https://www.uidaho.edu/class/music/ensembles/student-ensembles; Vandal Marching Band: https://www.uidaho.edu/class/music/ensembles/marching-band 

Do you offer Architecture as a major?

College of Idaho: No, but check out U of I!

College of Western Idaho: We don’t offer Architecture as a stand alone course. Within our Horticulture program we do offer Landscape Architecture courses for those interested in landscape design and creating wonderful green spaces for us to enjoy! Find out more at: https://cwi.edu/program/horticulture-technology 

Boise State University: At this time we do not offer architecture as a major, however here are the different majors currently offered: https://www.boisestate.edu/registrar-catalog/program-list/

Idaho State University: Nope, but I’m pretty sure our buddies at U of I do…right, Jessica? 😉

University of Idaho: Thanks for the shoutouts everyone! We do have architecture (including interior architecture and landscape architecture). And you can start your first two years in Boise if you’d like! https://www.uidaho.edu/caa/programs/architecture 

Do you offer Architecture as a major?

College of Idaho: No, but check out U of I!

College of Western Idaho: We don’t offer Architecture as a stand alone course. Within our Horticulture program we do offer Landscape Architecture courses for those interested in landscape design and creating wonderful green spaces for us to enjoy! Find out more at: https://cwi.edu/program/horticulture-technology 

Boise State University: At this time we do not offer architecture as a major, however here are the different majors currently offered: https://www.boisestate.edu/registrar-catalog/program-list/

Idaho State University: Nope, but I’m pretty sure our buddies at U of I do…right, Jessica? 😉

University of Idaho: Thanks for the shoutouts everyone! We do have architecture (including interior architecture and landscape architecture). And you can start your first two years in Boise if you’d like! https://www.uidaho.edu/caa/programs/architecture 

Do you have a class that teaches about STEM careers?

College of Idaho: You bet! We have a class that meets once a week that focuses on a different career in the Natural Sciences and Mathematics every week. Your senior capstone class within your major will also focus heavily on career opportunities within that degree field. Students also start meeting with our Career Coach their freshman year to explore internship, networking, and career opportunities.

College of Western Idaho: We offer a STEM degree that really allows students to explore the various aspects of STEM from Engineering to Physics from Geology to Animal Science. You can learn more about it at: https://cwi.edu/program/science-technology-engineering-and-math-stem

Boise State University: Our career services department is a great resource to discuss different career pathways and can be reached at career@boisestate.edu or (208) 426-1747. https://www.boisestate.edu/career/

Idaho State University: For more information about ISU’s College of Technology programs, please contact Corinne McCullough at corinnemccullough@isu.edu. For more information about ISU’s College of Science & Engineering, please contact Miriam Dance at miriamdance@isu.edu. For more information about ISU’s health professions programs, please contact Dana Gaudet at dana.gaudet@isu.edu.

University of Idaho: Within your classes you will get opportunities to get hands on experiences to help you explore careers. Plus, we have a career counselor for every department to help you get internships, job shadow, and in general help you figure out what you are going to do after you graduate from college.

Did you use third-party resource websites like buckthequo.com or did you find scholarships through your high school?

College of Idaho: I was lucky enough to receive a lot of private scholarships but it was a lot of work (worth it though!). A few tips I would recommend:

    • Create a separate email just for scholarships–you’ll get a lot of spam!
    • Treat this like a part time job – set aside a certain time every week where you just focus on applying to outside scholarships. 
    • Start early and create a calendar for various scholarship deadlines. A lot of scholarships have deadlines in February and March, so you don’t want to wait too long. You might find a great scholarship that isn’t open yet, so make a calendar event when it opens so you’ll get a reminder notification. Other scholarships will even let you apply your junior year or summer before your senior year, so you can get a head start!
    • Save all the essays you write as some scholarships have very similar essay prompts!
    • Start local and then work your way out. Next Steps Idaho has a whole scholarship database just for Idaho students at: nextsteps.idaho.gov/scholarship-listing. The Lightfoot Foundation also has a great scholarship only for Treasure Valley students. You can also check for scholarships on the state website, your city website, and your high school website. I do recommend applying for national scholarships too, but again, focus local first. Personally I used FastWeb.com and created a profile to match to specific scholarships, but there are a lot of different scholarship resources. Applying for scholarships is a long process, but don’t give up!

College of Western Idaho: I will defer to the scholarships folks- I always find that applying for scholarships that are more “close to home” is the best avenue. Check with your high school counselor on what might be available to you and then search the college websites you are interested in for their respective scholarship applications.

Boise State University: I recommend keeping an eye on scholarships deadlines and criteria as well as filling out FAFSA to know all their options of any aid they may qualify for: https://www.boisestate.edu/scholarships/

University of Idaho: Both! I mostly used fastweb.com and talked to my career/college counselor a lot. I recommend checking out the U of I Scholarship page under the sections State of Idaho and Additional Resources for more “outside” (meaning not U of I affiliated) scholarships.

What kind of colleges reached out to you and how did you know which one to go to?

College of Idaho: I received information from a ton of private and public colleges from all across the country. At first, it is helpful to get a lot of information and get a feel for what options are out there, but once you start to narrow down your college search don’t feel bad about telling a school that you would like to be taken off their contact list if you’re no longer interested – we don’t want to inundate you with information! I wound up applying to 10 colleges – which was A LOT – but ultimately chose my college based on a campus visit. For the longest time I was convinced I wanted to go out-of-state, but when I actually stepped foot on campus, I was blown away by how friendly and welcoming everyone was. I could actually see myself calling this place home for the next four years, which wasn’t a feeling I had on all my other campus visits. I strongly encourage students to visit the top schools they are considering, and if possible don’t just take a tour – meet with current students and professors, and sit in on a class too! You can schedule a visit to The College of Idaho at: https://apply.collegeofidaho.edu/portal/visitcampus 

College of Western Idaho: I knew I wanted to attend UI because I was passionate about Agriculture- that jump started me into finding my real passion (teaching) and now I get to educate students at CWI about everything Agriculture 🙂 I always tell students- we have some really stellar colleges within the state of Idaho- Don’t feel like you need/have to leave the state to get a really awesome opportunity! If you want to talk more about my path and why I chose what I did feel free to shoot me an email at andreaschumaker@cwi.edu 

Boise State University: Attending college fairs is a great way to gather info from different colleges and sign up to be sent more information.

University of Idaho: Picking a college can be overwhelming. I HIGHLY recommend visiting schools (And make sure to schedule a visit! Don’t just show up and expect them to be ready for you!). Visiting helped me realize what I wanted out of a college experience (for me, I wanted the “typical experience” with football games, greek life, residential campus in a college town, etc — for you it may be different and you’ll have different priorities.) I applied to several schools all over the place and waited to make my final decision based on scholarships/cost.

University of Idaho specific questions

What is the honors college like? What opportunities come from it?

  • Great question! I’ve heard people say that our Honors Program is a bit like getting the private school experience at a public school. We have perks like additional scholarships, more study abroad and research opportunities, priority class registration (meaning you can sign up for classes before anyone else), smaller class sizes, and more opportunities to connect with professors. It is something that I wished I had taken advantage of while I was in college. I had the wrong impression that the Honors Program would be a lot of busy work and take up too much of my time and not be worth it in the end, but everyone I have talked to has thoroughly enjoyed their experience. You can find more information here: https://www.uidaho.edu/academics/university-honors-program
  • I also highly recommend reaching out to one of our current students to ask about their experience: https://www.uidaho.edu/academics/university-honors-program/about/contact-student

What is the lowest gpa you can have to get into the engineering program at U of I

With the U of I could you get into extension programs like the 4-H extension?

  • 4-H is for youths aged 5-18 in every county in Idaho. Adults can be involved as volunteers.
  • 4-H is just one of the programs available through our Extension Office (which are in 22 of the 24 counties in Idaho).
  • You can find out more about the U of I Extension programs here: https://www.uidaho.edu/extension/programs
  • You can find more information about 4-H here: https://www.uidaho.edu/extension/4h

College of Western Idaho specific questions

Can I use my dual credits to be able to get an associate’s?

  • Yes- we have several students who actually earn their associate’s degree at the same time they are graduating high school. You can certainly go that path or acquire a lot of credit while in high school. We also offer a General Education Certificate https://cwi.edu/program/general-education if you are interested in having that under your belt before you transfer on as well. Any of the folks in our dual credit office would be happy to assist you. https://cwi.edu/programs-degrees/dual-credit